men's health 101: urology

We think it's safe to say that everyone wants to look good, feel good and be healthy. However, regardless of the best intentions, sometimes we fall short or quite frankly don't know where to start. You know you should be going to the doctor, but do you really know what to ask or how frequently you should be going? We're here to help. Welcome to Men's Health 101. Today's focus is everything urology. To get you started, we reached out to urologist Mehan Movassaghi to ask the basic questions every man should know. So, without further ado, let's dive in. 

___________________________________________________

How much water should a man be drinking every day?

Like many things in medicine, one size does NOT fit all. Water comprises over 60% of your body weight and many factors determine how much water is needed. For the average guy, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine suggest about 16 cups (or 4 liters) of water a day. For athletes, however, this might not be enough. Increased activity releases sweat in order to maintain body temperature which results in more fluid loss. It’s important to drink before, during and after exercise to help maintain hydration. Hot and humid conditions and high altitudes can also result in more bodily fluid losses, as can illnesses including fever, diarrhea or vomiting.


True or False: There are foods to both consume and avoid that help urinary tract health. If true, what are they? True.  

Although some people are more sensitive than others to food and drinks, alcohol, caffeine, and spicy foods are known to cause urinary frequency, urgency and at times burning. But the list can be lengthy. Usually when I have patients that have irritative urinary symptoms I provide them with a list of common foods and drinks to avoid including the following:


Alcoholic beverages
Apples and apple juice
Cantaloupe
Carbonated beverages
Chili and spicy foods
Chocolate
Citrus fruit
Coffee (including decaffeinated)
Cranberries and cranberry juice
Grapes
Guava
Milk Products: milk, cheese, cottage cheese, yogurt, ice cream
Peaches
Pineapple
Plums
Strawberries
Sugar especially artificial sweeteners, saccharin, aspartame, corn sweeteners, honey, fructose, sucrose, lactose
Tea
Tomatoes and tomato juice
Vitamin B complex
Vinegar

 

How often should men visit their urologist?

Depending on their age, men should see a doctor periodically. Most men don’t develop urologic issues, however, until age 40. The following list has been developed by the American Urologic Association as the men’s health checklist:

Ages19-39:

  • UA

  • Lipid profile

  • CBC/BMP

Ages 40-49:

  • Colorectal CA screening

  • PSA, once at age 40 unless increased family risk factors or African American.

  • Fasting glucose

  • UA

  • Lipid profile

  • CBC/BMP

  • Testosterone


Ages of 50-69:

  • CV risk factors

  • Colorectal CA screening

  • PSA, once at age 40 unless increased family risk factors or African American.

  • Fasting glucose

  • UA

  • Lipid profile

  • CBC/BMP

  • PVR/flow

  • ECG q 5 years

  • Testosterone screening

  • Eye exam (intraocular pressure)

  • Yearly skin examinations

Ages of 70:

  • CV risk factors

  • Colorectal CA screening

  • PSA, once at age 40 unless increased family risk factors or African American.

  • Fasting glucose

  • UA

  • Lipid profile

  • CBC/BMP

  • PVR/flow (results above)

  • ECG q 5 years

  • Testosterone screening

  • Eye exam (intraocular pressure)

  • Yearly skin examinations

  • Bone density

  • Mobility

  • Polypharmacy


While most of these exams don’t require a urology referral, starting at age 40 a visit to the urologist is a good idea to ensure that prostate health, sexual health, and urinary health are optimally maintained. More importantly, many urologic issues can be prevented so earlier intervention is always recommended.


When should men start getting prostate exams?

In general age 40. However, if there is a family history of prostate cancer then earlier tests are recommended.


What’s one piece of advice you give patients to better their overall urinary tract health?

DON’T avoid seeing a doctor. Your body is once the most complex machines on earth. It is programmed to tell you something is wrong. Pain, burning, blood or anything out the ordinary related to your urologic health is a sign that something is wrong. Get checked out ASAP because most issues, if addressed early, are usually easily solved.

 

Mehran Movassaghi, M.D., is a board-certified, fellowship trained urologist who has vast experience with endourology and men’s health. Dr. Movassaghi began the first of its kind comprehensive men’s health program in the Los Angeles area and is now part of the Providence Medical Group. Dr. Movassaghi is a member of the American Urological Association, the Endourological Society and serves on the board for the American Society for Men’s Health. He is the founder of the Los Angeles Prostate Cancer 5K and an avid advocate of prevention for both urologic and other forms of chronic illness.  In his latest endeavor, Dr. Movassaghi is spearheading Pacific Men’s Health combining urologic care with a holistic approach including nutrition, physical therapy and brain health to tackle each issue in a patient-centered comprehensive manner.  

performance — By jj peterson
how to run faster: a sprint workout
performance — By the rhone team
brands we love: switch playground

in available credit

Go Back
$credit
In available credit
Back to return