Valentine's Day Gifting | Free Commuter Socks on orders $175+ Shop Now Valentine's Day Gifting | Free Commuter Socks on orders $175+ Shop Now
Valentine's Day Shipping Cut Offs Valentine's Day Shipping Cut Offs See Details
Save up to 20% off with Packs and Kits Shop Now Save up to 20% off with Packs and Kits Shop Now
back to all posts
Community -

The Sweet Spot & a Sweat Sesh

I was a baseball guy. I played competitively from the age of 9 years old until I was 21, moving through different competitive leagues, into Division 1 college baseball, and into a season in the minor leagues…which was cut short due to an injury and the full realization that baseball wasn’t what I really wanted to do–but more on that another time. I learned a lot about life through the modality of baseball and as I look back I realize that it was a treasure trove of continually relevant disciplines, values, and tenets.

In particular, one conversation that I had with my father really sticks out, and was the start of a great, continuing quest in my life… and I’ve found that a great quest always starts with a great question! My dad held out a baseball bat and asked a wide-eyed 7 year old me: “What’s the best place to hit the ball?” I grabbed the bat and pointed to a spot a few inches away from the end cap of the bat and exclaimed “Here!” He then said “That’s right, and do you know why?” I didn’t have an answer, and after a while he said “It’s because that’s the Sweet Spot. If you hit the ball on the bat right there, you’ll hit the ball the hardest and make it go the furthest. All you have to do is keep your eye on the ball, make contact, and swing like you mean it.” It’s that statement that turned me into an extremely powerful hitter.

These days, in my coaching practice and for my own growth, I use slightly different language to send the same message. Sometimes I call it the Sweet Spot but sometimes I call it the Middle Path, which is the space of optimal performance and decision-making between two seeming opposites

“Keep your eye on the ball” is another way of saying to be present and pay attention to your goals. 

“Make contact” is another way of saying to take disciplined action. 

And of course, “swing like you mean it” is another way of expressing the importance of committing yourself and always doing your best. 

I find that these ideas are totally necessary in order for us to actualize, to grow out of and into ourselves, with graceful direction… but how do we practice them? Well, there’s a very feasible way to do this on a day-to-day basis, and that is through the mindfulness practice of intentional movement

Instead of thinking of your workout as a time to zone out, I invite you to view it as a time to hone in. I’ve programmed a workout designed through some of the tenets I still live by: find the sweet spot, keep your eye on the ball, make contact, and swing like you mean it. It is a full body strength workout utilizing elements of LIHI (Low-Impact, High-Intensity) and PHA (Peripheral Heart ActionT raining). This workout is designed to be easy on your joints while staying beneficial for your metabolism, circulation, and muscle activation. Make sure you warm up with a few minutes of movement that raises your heart rate, and ease yourself into the individual movements by finding a full range of motion before you get started with your set.

Find The Sweet Spot 

  • Select a weight that is light enough to be able to use for the full 60 seconds without stopping but heavy enough to where it's a struggle by the end of the set.

  • Stay true to the intention of each movement, but make adjustments along the way to suit your body and fitness level. 

  • Stay patient while also staying assertive.

Keep Your Eye on the Ball

  • Attention will waver from time-to-time and that is okay. What matters the most is that you pull your attention back in when you lose focus. You may find that if you approach fitness in this way, that is, as a mindfulness practice, you may have an easier time staying focused and being aware of distractions that try to take your focus on a day-to-day basis.

Make Contact

  • Nothing changes if nothing changes. Making contact here starts with simply doing the workout, but it is really about committing to the discipline required to stay true to each move, to each set, and beyond this workout as a way of living. You may find that practicing discipline in an uncomfortable, yet controlled setting within this workout can contribute to staying disciplined in life in uncomfortable, and perhaps uncontrollable circumstances. 

Swing Like You Mean It

  • Do your best… and I mean YOUR best. Take my workout protocol with a grain of salt, if you can give yourself more than I suggest, or need to pull back a little, that is all good! When we work with what we’ve got in the gym, we may find that we are better able to do so in the greater context of our lives.

About the Sweet Spot Workout 

  • This workout takes on a holistic approach meaning that the sagittal, transverse, and frontal planes of motion will all be accounted for.

  • This workout utilizes PHA Training (Peripheral Heart Action) which is a great way of getting HIIT-like benefits without having to implement fast, high-impact movements with move rapid-fire succession.

  • This workout utilizes LIHI Training (Low-Impact, High-Intensity), meaning there are no plyometrics, but the intensity stays high and mighty.

  • There is a focus on different muscle contractions for each move–some focus on the concentric contraction (raising the weight up phase) while others focus on the eccentric contraction (lowering the weight down phase), and some will focus on the isometric contraction (holding a contraction). 

  • Other factors include proprioception (balance) training, breathwork training, and mirror-function training. 

Protocol Guidelines 

  • The workout protocol is made up of two circuits. 

  • Utilize a 2:1 work to rest ratio, performing each move for 60 seconds with 30 seconds of recovery in between moves, for a total of 2-3 rounds of each circuit. After completing the first circuit, recover for up to 1-2 minutes before engaging in the second circuit. 

  • Make sure to select weights for which you can complete the entire 60 seconds without stopping. 

  • It is meant to be challenging, but… have fun. Life is too short to think that things have to be one or the other-–you can both work hard and enjoy yourself! 

What You Need

  • A medium set of dumbbells and one heavier dumbbell

  • Appropriate shoes for lateral movement

  • A sense of patience, perseverance, and purpose

The Workout

PHA Circuit 

1. 12x Goblet Squat to Internal Rotation (6 on each side, utilizing one dumbbell)

  • Start by standing tall, with your shoulders back and down away from your ears, and your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. Sit your hips back as if you were about to sit on a chair behind you, while retaining upright posture with your upper body. Slowly lower with a focus on keeping your weight on the mid-to-back part of your feet, and gradually rotate your torso so that your upper body faces one direction, then come up through the squat via the same route it took you to go down. Repeat on the opposite side. 

  • 3-2-1 time scheme- 3 seconds down, 2 second pause, 1 second up.

  • Make sure to emphasize bodyweight pressure through the foot you are rotating towards.

  • Inhale through the nose on the way down, exhale powerfully through the mouth coming up.

2. 12x Eccentric Bicep Curl

  • Start by standing tall, with your shoulders back and down away from your ears, and your feet shoulder-width apart.  

  • 1-2-3 time scheme- 1 second up, 2 second active contraction, 3 seconds down.

  • With your palms facing in front of you, bring the weights up so that your knuckles are in front of the front of your shoulders. Make sure your elbows stay next to your ribcage, and avoid using full-body momentum to bring the weight up. 

  • At the top of the movement, actively squeeze your biceps for 2 seconds (even thought they are already contracting), then come down slowly for 3 seconds.

  • Inhale through the nose slowly as the wrights come down down, exhale powerfully through the mouth coming up.

3. 12x Curtsy Lunge + Windup (6 on each side, utilizing one dumbbell)

  • Start by standing tall, with your shoulders back and down away from your ears, and your feet shoulder-width apart. 

  • Bring your left foot back, and swoop it behind your right foot. 

  • Once in the lower position, keeping your body weight on your right (front) foot, rotate your body in the direction of your (front) foot right. 

  • After completing the windup (aka slow rotation), reset your upper body before pushing through your right (front) foot to return to the starting position.

  • Keep your breathing steady and natural throughout the course of the move- don't hold your breath.

4. 12x Marching Shoulder Press 

  • Start by standing tall, with your shoulders back and down away from your ears, and your feet shoulder-width apart. Tilt your tailbone towards the ground and engage your glutes. 

  • Rack the weights above your shoulders. Keep your elbows in and directly press the right weight up, extending fully through the elbow. As you lower the right weight down, simultaneously begin to move the left weight up, so that they reach the top and bottom respectively at the same time. 

  • Repeat in a steady, continuous manner, staying conscious of keeping your tailbone tucked towards the ground (posterior pelvic tilt).

  • Keep your breathing steady and natural throughout the course of the move- don't hold your breath.

Compound Circuit 

Start with your more coordinated side

1. 6x Balance Deadlift to Row Hold

  • Start by standing tall, with your shoulders back and down away from your ears, and your feet shoulder-width apart, in a staggered stance position with your right leg in front and left leg behind. 

  • Hold the weight in the right hand, and balance through your left foot as your right foot travels behind you into the balance deadlift position. 

  • Once your chest is parallel to the ground, perform one row with the weight, being sure to hold the position for two seconds in the upward contraction. 

  • Slowly lower the weight while retaining your balance before returning to the standing position.

  • Inhale slowly on the way down, exhale as you row the weight up, inhale as you lower the weight, and exhale as you return to the standing position through the deadlift.

2. 6x Instep Side Lunge to High Pull 

  • Start by standing tall, with your shoulders back and down away from your ears, and your feet shoulder-width apart.

  • With the weight in your right hand, travel out laterally to the left and internally rotate towards your left instep as you reach the low side lunge position. 

  • As you return to the standing position, utilize your momentum to perform a cross-body upright row. Reset to the starting position and repeat.

  • Keep your breathing steady throughout the course of the movement.

3. 6x Balance Deadlift to Row Hold 

  • Start by standing tall, with your shoulders back and down away from your ears, and your feet shoulder-width apart, in a staggered stance position with your left leg in front and right leg behind. 

  • Hold the weight in the left hand, and balance through your right foot as your left foot travels behind you into the balance deadlift position. 

  • Once your chest is parallel to the ground, perform one row with the weight, being sure to hold the position for two seconds in the upward contraction. 

  • Slowly lower the weight while retaining your balance before returning to the standing position

4. 6x Instep Side Lunge to High Pull 

  • Start by standing tall, with your shoulders back and down away from your ears, and your feet shoulder-width apart.

  • With the weight in your left hand, travel out laterally to the right and internally rotate towards your right instep as you reach the low side lunge position. 

  • As you return to the standing position, utilize your momentum to perform a cross-body upright row. Reset to the starting position and repeat.

When we work out with intentional movement, we not only step into discomfort, we look it in the eye and realize that it is a great teacher for us, and always has something to give if we are only open to receiving it. In doing this workout, we step into an arena of known, controlled adversity, which is practice for the unknown, uncontrolled adversity. When we let ourselves be vulnerable enough to try something we know is going to be a challenge, we equip ourselves with the repeated understanding that we can gain a lot of strength from facing what we’d rather turn away from. This is your opportunity to make intentional movement a mindfulness practice

What we practice in, we progress in. I programmed this protocol with several different factors in mind. Another tenet I live by is that “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.” I pulled from my amalgamated experience through my BA in Psychology, as a CPC (Certified Professional Coach), a CPT (Certified Personal Trainer), as a former competitive/professional athlete, and as someone who looks at life through a spiritual lens. I continually find that if we approach fitness with the understanding that all of life is interconnected, we broaden our perspectives and when we broaden our perspectives, we increase our sense of what is possible. When we increase our sense of what is possible, we realize that we are powerful, and that what we do, say, and how we act matters. When we know that we matter, it’s a constant call to action–an action that myself and the Rhone team embody–an action to move Forever Forward. Step into the batters box of life, and know that you’re worthy of being there. Find your sweet spot, keep your eye on the ball, make contact, and swing like you mean it.


Keep up with Kenny and his Pursuits throughout mindset, movement and more.

Related Posts

© Rhone 2023. All Rights Reserved